Tips for Great Corporate & Publicity Portraits

Finding a Photographer

One of the best ways to find a photographer is through the local grapevine or word-of-mouth. Ask some of your business associates if they know of a skilled corporate photographer. Make sure the photographer you pick has experience in corporate and publicity photography. Once you've found possible photographers, ask to look at their portfolios. Also, talk to the photographers about their experience. Don't be timid about references and previous clients. Contact a few of them and ask how the sessions went.

Don't Rely on an Amateur Photographer

If your cousin has a new digital camera, or a cell phone with a camera, and offers to take your photo to save you money, use a professional instead. Trust me, the expense will be well worth it. Many of the bad-quality photos I see are too dark, out of focus, grainy, scanned incorrectly, or taken against a busy backdrop--often by amateur photographers. I’ve seen photos that look as though people have plants growing out of the tops of their heads. I saw another photo of a businessman with his eyes closed. A woman gave me a photo of her in a sleeveless blouse, with her bra strap showing. Some people send editors snapshots that show them with friends and family members. Most editors won’t bother cropping out babies, husbands or friends. They just won’t use your photo.

Order a Good Selection of Prints

Pay for as many shots as you can afford so you have a good selection of images from which to choose. Also, ask the photographer if the photo shoot can include one or two wardrobe changes. In addition to the head shot, you might also consider a storytelling photo that shows you with "props" related to your business. A hobbie store owner, for example, might be photographed behind a model train display. Weekly newspapers that don't have photo employees would welcome these types of photos.

Order Several Sizes

Most print and online publications use electronic photos, but some don’t. So you should have several wallet-size photos and at least one 4x6 print on hand just in case someone asks for it. If you’re mailing prints, attach a label to the back of the photo. It should include your name, address, phone number, email address and the year the photo was taken. Never write on the backs of photos with a pen or felt-tip marker. If you are mailing more than one photo, slip a blank piece of paper between them. Sometimes the pressure of the post office’s mailing equipment can cause the back of one picture to rub off onto the front of another. I advise business people that when sending prints to publications, don’t ask editors to return them. It makes you look cheap. Besides, you want to encourage them to keep the photos in their files for use months or even years later.

General Tips for Publicity Photos

Your official publicity photo is an important and basic item of the publicity kit because it is probably the most striking and effective part of it. Your publicity photo has a significant psychological impact on how your business is perceived. Just like the look of your storefront, building or office conveys an image of your business, so too does the photo you put into your kit. To ensure that you project the right kind of professional image your business deserves, take great care in selecting a professional photographer and in selecting the right photos from the session. Remember to choose a photo that will look good reduced down to the size of photos you see in the print media.

Here Are Some General Tips for the Session Itself:

Wear your usual hairstyle. Don't try anything new. Make sure your hair is styled the way you want it before you arrive at the studio. If you need a haircut, have it done one or two weeks before your photo session. Wear clothing appropriate to your profession. If you’re a gardener, don’t have your photo taken in a suit and tie. Avoid high-neck clothing that obscures your neck. Avoid sleeveless clothing. It's risky to wear prints that draw attention away from your face. When in doubt, be safe with solids. When applying make-up, pay special attention to your eyes. That's what people see first. Eye shadow adds depth. Avoid iridescent colors. Stick to neutral. If you wear glasses, ask your optometrist if you can borrow a pair without lenses. That way there won’t be any glare. Powder reduces shine and helps eliminate shiny foreheads and noses. Be sure to tell your photographer the photos are for publicity so he knows what kind of backdrop to use. And tell him not to use a “soft focus” lense. Your photo should have sharp tones with good contrast. Don't have your photo taken when you have a dark suntan or it will look like your face is oily. Don’t forget to smile! If you don’t, you might come off looking bored or sad. Source: Joan Stewart - The Publicity Hound
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Corporate Portrait Tips

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Copyright 2005-2017, Stephanie Juhl Juhl Photography  205 East Main Street Watertown WI 53094  (920) 206-8668
CORPORATE PORTRAIT TIPS
Tips for Great Corporate & Publicity Portraits

Finding a Photographer

One of the best ways to find a photographer is through the local grapevine or word-of- mouth. Ask some of your business associates if they know of a skilled corporate photographer. Make sure the photographer you pick has experience in corporate and publicity photography. Once you've found possible photographers, ask to look at their portfolios. Also, talk to the photographers about their experience. Don't be timid about references and previous clients. Contact a few of them and ask how the sessions went.

Don't Rely on an Amateur Photographer

If your cousin has a new digital camera, or a cell phone with a camera, and offers to take your photo to save you money, use a professional instead. Trust me, the expense will be well worth it. Many of the bad-quality photos I see are too dark, out of focus, grainy, scanned incorrectly, or taken against a busy backdrop--often by amateur photographers. I’ve seen photos that look as though people have plants growing out of the tops of their heads. I saw another photo of a businessman with his eyes closed. A woman gave me a photo of her in a sleeveless blouse, with her bra strap showing. Some people send editors snapshots that show them with friends and family members. Most editors won’t bother cropping out babies, husbands or friends. They just won’t use your photo.

Order a Good Selection of Prints

Pay for as many shots as you can afford so you have a good selection of images from which to choose. Also, ask the photographer if the photo shoot can include one or two wardrobe changes. In addition to the head shot, you might also consider a storytelling photo that shows you with "props" related to your business. A hobbie store owner, for example, might be photographed behind a model train display. Weekly newspapers that don't have photo employees would welcome these types of photos.

Order Several Sizes

Most print and online publications use electronic photos, but some don’t. So you should have several wallet-size photos and at least one 4x6 print on hand just in case someone asks for it. If you’re mailing prints, attach a label to the back of the photo. It should include your name, address, phone number, email address and the year the photo was taken. Never write on the backs of photos with a pen or felt-tip marker. If you are mailing more than one photo, slip a blank piece of paper between them. Sometimes the pressure of the post office’s mailing equipment can cause the back of one picture to rub off onto the front of another. I advise business people that when sending prints to publications, don’t ask editors to return them. It makes you look cheap. Besides, you want to encourage them to keep the photos in their files for use months or even years later.

General Tips for Publicity Photos

Your official publicity photo is an important and basic item of the publicity kit because it is probably the most striking and effective part of it. Your publicity photo has a significant psychological impact on how your business is perceived. Just like the look of your storefront, building or office conveys an image of your business, so too does the photo you put into your kit. To ensure that you project the right kind of professional image your business deserves, take great care in selecting a professional photographer and in selecting the right photos from the session. Remember to choose a photo that will look good reduced down to the size of photos you see in the print media.

Here Are Some General Tips for the

Session Itself:

Wear your usual hairstyle. Don't try anything new. Make sure your hair is styled the way you want it before you arrive at the studio. If you need a haircut, have it done one or two weeks before your photo session. Wear clothing appropriate to your profession. If you’re a gardener, don’t have your photo taken in a suit and tie. Avoid high-neck clothing that obscures your neck. Avoid sleeveless clothing. It's risky to wear prints that draw attention away from your face. When in doubt, be safe with solids. When applying make-up, pay special attention to your eyes. That's what people see first. Eye shadow adds depth. Avoid iridescent colors. Stick to neutral. If you wear glasses, ask your optometrist if you can borrow a pair without lenses. That way there won’t be any glare. Powder reduces shine and helps eliminate shiny foreheads and noses. Be sure to tell your photographer the photos are for publicity so he knows what kind of backdrop to use. And tell him not to use a “soft focus” lense. Your photo should have sharp tones with good contrast. Don't have your photo taken when you have a dark suntan or it will look like your face is oily. Don’t forget to smile! If you don’t, you might come off looking bored or sad. Source: Joan Stewart - The Publicity Hound
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